Communities need timely data to understand the health of their citizens and to plan improvements. In the last five years, communities lost the heath data tools critical to a healthy community.

Independent physician-owned practices have cost and quality outcomes that are equal to, or better than, practices owned by systems, and the loss of independent practices could harm primary care access, quality, and costs. In a recent policy brief published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine, One-Third of Family Physicians Remain in Independently Owned Practice, 2017-2019, authors Diane R. Rittenhouse, Andrew W. Bazemore, Zachary J. Morgan, and Lars E.

The Federation of State Medical Boards (FSMB), which supports its member state medical licensing boards, has recently issued a statement saying that providing misinformation about the COVID-19 vaccine contradicts physicians’ ethical and professional responsibilities, and therefore may subject a physician to disciplinary actions, including suspension or revocation of their medical license. We at the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM), the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM), and the American Board of Pediatrics (ABP) support FSMB’s position.

Staying current with medical literature can be challenging for any physician, especially as they care for patients and balance countless other responsibilities. That’s why the American Board of Family Medicine (ABFM) is proud to announce the launch of the National Journal Club Pilot. This new service provides ABFM Diplomates access to the latest peer-reviewed articles and the ability to earn certification points.

High-quality primary care is the foundation of the health care system. It provides continuous, person-centered, relationship-based care that considers the needs and preferences of individuals, families, and communities.

We are pleased to announce the election of four new officers and four new board members. The new officers elected at the American Board of Family Medicine’s (ABFM) spring board meeting in April are: Michael K. Magill, MD, of Salt Lake City, Utah as Chair; Lauren S. Hughes, MD, MPH, MSc, of Aurora, Colorado as Chair-Elect; Wendy Biggs, MD, of Saginaw, Michigan as Treasurer; and Daniel Spogen, MD, of Reno, Nevada as Member-at-Large of the Executive Committee.

The number of family medicine residents with more than $250,000 in self-reported educational debt increased by 81% over a 5-year period, according to a recent study published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine.

Social determinants of health have greater influence on health than health care, yet Medicare and most other payers have held out on adjusting payments to better support clinicians’ capacity to address social needs. In 2014, the US Congress charged the Secretary of Health and Human Services with answering whether and how to accomplish this. And while a series of reports commissioned of the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (NASEM) recommended the need for such payment adjustments, the Secretary has not delivered a policy.

Every year, more than 45,000 medical students graduate and start additional residency training that will determine their practice specialties. A formal Match helps students and programs choose each other and that process starts with an application process managed by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC).

The ABFM research department, in partnership with the Robert Graham Center for Policy Studies in Washington D.C., is launching a multi-year policy brief series on Examining Equity and Diversity in the Family Medicine Workforce to be featured in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine (JABFM). The first policy brief is scheduled to be published in the November-December 2021 issue, with a series introduction to appear in the January-February 2022 issue.